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Let nobody turn us around : voices of resistance, reform, and renewal : an African American anthology /

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  • 3 of 3 copies available at SC LENDS. (Show)
  • 1 of 1 copy available at Kershaw County Library System.

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0 current holds with 3 total copies.

Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Status Due Date
Kershaw - Camden Library 973.0496 LET (Text) 33255003438265 Adult Non-Fiction Available -

Record details

  • ISBN: 9780742560574
  • ISBN: 9780742560567
  • Physical Description: xxix, 676 pages ; 23 cm
    print
  • Edition: Second Edition.
  • Publisher: Lanham, Maryland : Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc., [2009]

Content descriptions

Bibliography, etc. Note: Includes bibliographical references and index.
Formatted Contents Note: Preface to the first edition -- Preface to the second edition -- Introduction: Resistance, reform, and renewal in the black experience -- Foundations : slavery and abolition, 1768-1867. "On being brought from Africa to America" Equiano," / Phyllis Wheatley, 1768 -- "The interesting narrative of the life of Olaudah Equiano," / Olaudah Equiano, 1789 -- "Thus doth Ethiopia stretch forth her hand from slavery, to freedom and equality" / Prince Hall, 1797 -- The founding of the African Methodist Episcopal Church / Richard Allen, 1816 -- David Walker's "Appeal", 1829-1830 -- The statement of Nat Turner, 1831 -- Slaves are prohibited to read and write by law -- "What if I am a woman?" / Maria W. Stewart, 1833 -- A slave denied the rights to marry / letter of Milo Thompson, slave, 1834 -- The selling of slaves / advertisement, 1835 -- Solomon Northrup describes a New Orleans slave auction, 1841 -- Cinque and the Amistad revolt, 1841 -- "Let your motto be resistance!" / Henry Highland Garnet, 1843 -- "Slavery as it is," / William Wells Brown, 1847 -- "A'n't I a woman?" / Sojourner Truth, 1851 -- "A plea for emigration, or Notes of Canada West" / Mary Ann Shadd Cary, 1852 -- A black nationalist Manifesto / Martin R. Delany, 1852 -- "What to the slave is the Fourth of July?" / Frederick Douglass, 1852 -- "No rights that a white man is bound to respect": the Dred Scott Case and its aftermath -- "Whenever the colored man is elevated, it will be by his own exertions" / John S. Rock, 1858 -- The spirituals: "Go down, Moses" and "Didn't my Lord deliver Daniel." Reconstruction and reaction : the aftermath of slavery and the dawn of segregation, 1861-1915. "What the black man wants" / Frederick Douglass, 1865 -- Henry McNeal Turner, Black Christian Nationalist -- Black urban workers during Reconstruction: Anonymous document on the National Colored Labor Convention, 1869 ; New York Tribune article on African-American workers, 1870 -- "Labor and capital are in deadly conflict" / T. Thomas Fortune, 1886 -- Edward Wilmot Blyden and the African diaspora -- "The Democratic idea is humanity" / Alexander Crummell, 1888 -- "A voice from the South" / Anna Julia Cooper, 1892 -- The National Association of Colored Women: Mary Church Terrell and Josephine St. Pierre Ruffin -- "I know why the caged bird sings" / Paul Laurence Dunbar -- Booker T. Washington and the politics of accomodation: "Atlanta Exposition address" ; "My view of segregation laws" -- William Monroe Trotter and the Boston Guardian -- Race and the Southern worker: "A Negro woman speaks" ; The race question a class question" ; "Negro workers!" -- Ida B. Wells-Barnett, crusader for justice -- William Edward Burghardt Du Bois: Excerpts from "The conservation of races" ; Excerpts from The souls of black folk -- The Niagara movement, 1905 -- Hubert Henry Harrison, black revolutionary nationalist. From plantation to ghetto : the great migration, Harlem Renaissance, and World War, 1915-1954. Black conflict over World War I: W.E.B. Du Bois, "Close ranks" ; Hubert H. Harrison, "The descent of Du Bois" ; W.E.B. Du Bois, "Returning soldiers" -- "If we must die" / Claude McKay, 1919 -- Black Bolsheviks: Cyril V. Briggs and Claude McKay: "What the African Blood Brotherhood stands for" ; "Soviet Russia and the Negro" -- Marcus Garvey and the Universal Negro Improvement Association: "Declaration of rights of the Negro Peoples of the world" ; "An appeal to the conscience of the black race to see itself" -- "Women as leaders / Amy Euphemia Jacques Garvey, 1925 -- Langston Hughes and the Harlem Renaissance: "The Negro artist and the racial mountain" ; "My America" ; Poems -- "The Negro woman and the ballot" / Alice Moore Dunbar-Nelson, 1927 -- James Weldon Johnson and Harlem in the 1920s: "Harlem: the culture capital" -- Black workers in the Great Depression -- The Scottsboro Trials, 1930s -- "You cannot kill the working class" / Angelo Herndon, 1933: "Speech to the jury, January 17, 1933" ; Excerpt from "You cannot kill the working class -- Hosea Hudson, black Communist activist -- "Breaking the bars to brotherhood" / Mary McLeod Bethune, 1935 -- Adam Clayton Powell, Jr., and the fight for black employment in Harlem -- Black women workers during the Great Depression: Elaine Ellis, "Women of the cotton fields" ; Naomi Ward, "I am a domestic" -- Southern Negro Youth Conference, 1939 -- A. Philip Randolph and the Negro March on Washington Movement, 1941 -- Charles Hamilton Houston and the war effort among African Americans, 1944 -- "An end to the neglect of the problems of the Negro woman!" / Claudia Jones, 1949 -- "The Negro artist looks ahead" / Paul Robeson, 1951 -- Thurgood Marshall: The Brown decision and the struggle for school desegregation. We shall overcome : the second reconstruction, 1954-1975. Rosa PArks, Jo Ann Robinson, and the Montgomery Bus Boycott, 1955-1956. Jo Ann Robinson's letter to Mayor of Montgomery ; Interview with Rosa Parks ; Excerpts from Jo Ann Robinson's account of the boycott -- Roy Wilkins and the NAACP -- The Southern Christian Leadership Conference, 1957 -- Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and the sit-in movement, 1960 -- Freedom songs, 1960s: "We shall overcome" ; "Ain't gonna let nobody turn me 'round" -- "We need group-centered leadership" / Ella Baker -- Martin Luther King, Jr., and nonviolence: Excerpt from "Nonviolence and racial justice," 1957 ; "A have a dream," 1963 -- The revolution is at hand" / John R. Lewis, 1963 -- The salvation of American Negroes lies in Socialism" / W.E.B. Du Bois -- "The special plight and the role of black women" / Fannie Lou Hammer -- "SNCC position paper: Women in the Movement," 1964 -- Elijah Muhammad and the Nation of Islam -- Malcom X and Revolutionary Black Nationalism: "The ballot or the bullet" ; Statement of the Organization of Afro-American Unity" -- Black power: Stokely Carmichael, "What we want" ; SNCC, "Position paper on Black Power" ; Bayard Rustin, "'Black Power' and coalition politics" -- "CORE endorses Black Power" / Floyd McKissick, 1967 -- "To atone for our sins and errors in Vietnam" / Martin Luther King, Jr., 1967 -- Huey P. Newton and the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense -- "The people have to have the power" / Fred Hampton -- "I am a revolutionary black woman" / Angela Y. Davis, 1970 -- "Our thing is DRUM!" the League of Revolutionary Black Workers -- Attica: "The fury of those who are oppressed," 1971 -- The National Black political Convention, Gary, Indiana, March 1972 -- "There is no revolution without the people" / Amiri Baraka, 1972: "The Pan-African Party and the Black Nation" ; Poem -- "My sight is gone but my vision remains" / Menry Winston: "On returning to the struggle" ; "A letter to my brothers and sisters." The future in the present : contemporary African-American thought, 1975-present. Black feminisms: The Combahee River Collective Statement, 1977 -- "Women in prison: how we are" / Assata Shakur, 1978 -- It's our turn" / Harold Washington, 1983 -- "I am your sister" / Audre Lorde, 1984 -- "Shaping feminist theory" / bell hooks, 1984 -- The movement against Apartheid: Jesse Jackson and Randall Robinson. Jesse Jackson: "Don't adjust to Apartheid" ; "State of the U.S. Anti-Apartheid movement: an interview with Randall Robinson" -- "Keep hope alive" / Jesse Jackson, 1988 -- Afrocentricity" / Molefi Asante -- The Anita Hill-Clarence Thomas controversy, 1991. "African-American women in defense of ourselves" ; June Jordan, "Can I get a witness?" -- "Race matters" / Cornel West, 1991 -- "Black anti-Semitism" / Henry Louis Gates, Jr., 1992 -- "Crime-- causes and cures" / Jarvis Tyner, 1994 -- Louis Farrakhan: The million man march, 1995 -- "A voice from death row" / Mumia Abu-Jamal -- "Let justice roll down like waters" / African-American Prisoners in Sing Sing, 1998. "Statement by Sing Sing Prisoners" ; Michael J. Love, "The prison-industrial complex: an investment in failure" ; Willis L. Steele, Jr. "River Hudson" -- Black Radical Congress, 1998: "Principles of unity" ; The struggle continues: setting a black liberation agenda for the 21st century" ; The freedom agenda" -- 2000 Presidential election. "Letter to Governor Bush from Chairperson Mary Frances Berry," 2001 -- Hip-hop activism. "What we want" statement from Hip-Hop Action Summit Network, 2001 ; "Tookie protocol for peace," 2004 -- World Conference Against Racism-- Durban, South Africa -- African Americans respond to terrorism and war. "Barbara Lee's stand," 2001 ; 10 points from Iraq Veterans agianst the War, 2001 -- The Cosby vs. Dyson Debate, 2004-2005. Summary of "Dr. Bill Cosby speaks at the 50th commemoration of the Brown vs. Tokepa Board of Education Supreme Court Decision" ; Excerpt from "Is Bill Cosby right?: or has the black middle class lost its mind?" -- U.S. Senate Resolution against lynching, 2005 -- Hurricane Katrina Crisis, 2005: "This is criminal": Malik Rahim reports from New Orleans, 2005 -- Barack Obama's Presidential campaign, 2007-2008: Excerpts from National Democratic Party Convention speech, 2004 ; "A more perfect union," 2008.
Summary, etc.: "This anthology of black writers traces the evolution of African-American perspectives throughout American history, from the early years of slavery to the end of the 20th century. The essays, manifestos, interviews, and documents assembled here, contextualized with critical commentaries from Marable and Mullings, introduce the reader to the character and important controversies of each period of black history." "The selections represent a broad spectrum of ideology. Conservative, radical, nationalistic, and integrationist approaches can be found in almost every period, yet there have been striking shifts in the evolution of social thought and activism. The editors judiciously illustrate how both continuity and change affected the African-American community in terms of its internal divisions, class structure, migration, social problems, leadership, and protest movements. They also show how gender, spirituality, literature, music, and connections to Africa and the Caribbean played a prominent role in black life and history."--Jacket.
Subject: African Americans -- Social conditions -- Sources
African Americans -- Civil rights -- History -- Sources
African Americans -- History -- Sources
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24500. ‡aLet nobody turn us around : ‡bvoices of resistance, reform, and renewal : an African American anthology / ‡ceditors, Manning Marable, Leith Mullings.
250 . ‡aSecond Edition.
264 1. ‡aLanham, Maryland : ‡bRowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc., ‡c[2009]
300 . ‡axxix, 676 pages ; ‡c23 cm
336 . ‡atext ‡btxt ‡2rdacontent
337 . ‡aunmediated ‡bn ‡2rdamedia
338 . ‡avolume ‡bnc ‡2rdacarrier
504 . ‡aIncludes bibliographical references and index.
5201 . ‡a"This anthology of black writers traces the evolution of African-American perspectives throughout American history, from the early years of slavery to the end of the 20th century. The essays, manifestos, interviews, and documents assembled here, contextualized with critical commentaries from Marable and Mullings, introduce the reader to the character and important controversies of each period of black history." "The selections represent a broad spectrum of ideology. Conservative, radical, nationalistic, and integrationist approaches can be found in almost every period, yet there have been striking shifts in the evolution of social thought and activism. The editors judiciously illustrate how both continuity and change affected the African-American community in terms of its internal divisions, class structure, migration, social problems, leadership, and protest movements. They also show how gender, spirituality, literature, music, and connections to Africa and the Caribbean played a prominent role in black life and history."--Jacket.
50500. ‡tPreface to the first edition -- ‡tPreface to the second edition -- ‡tIntroduction: Resistance, reform, and renewal in the black experience -- ‡tFoundations : slavery and abolition, 1768-1867. ‡t"On being brought from Africa to America" Equiano," / ‡rPhyllis Wheatley, 1768 -- ‡t"The interesting narrative of the life of Olaudah Equiano," / ‡rOlaudah Equiano, 1789 -- ‡t"Thus doth Ethiopia stretch forth her hand from slavery, to freedom and equality" / ‡rPrince Hall, 1797 -- ‡tThe founding of the African Methodist Episcopal Church / ‡rRichard Allen, 1816 -- ‡tDavid Walker's "Appeal", 1829-1830 -- ‡tThe statement of Nat Turner, 1831 -- ‡tSlaves are prohibited to read and write by law -- ‡t"What if I am a woman?" / ‡rMaria W. Stewart, 1833 -- ‡tA slave denied the rights to marry / ‡rletter of Milo Thompson, slave, 1834 -- ‡tThe selling of slaves / ‡radvertisement, 1835 -- ‡tSolomon Northrup describes a New Orleans slave auction, 1841 -- ‡tCinque and the Amistad revolt, 1841 -- ‡t"Let your motto be resistance!" / ‡rHenry Highland Garnet, 1843 -- ‡t"Slavery as it is," / ‡rWilliam Wells Brown, 1847 -- ‡t"A'n't I a woman?" / ‡rSojourner Truth, 1851 -- ‡t"A plea for emigration, or Notes of Canada West" / ‡rMary Ann Shadd Cary, 1852 -- ‡tA black nationalist Manifesto / ‡rMartin R. Delany, 1852 -- ‡t"What to the slave is the Fourth of July?" / ‡rFrederick Douglass, 1852 -- ‡t"No rights that a white man is bound to respect": the Dred Scott Case and its aftermath -- ‡t"Whenever the colored man is elevated, it will be by his own exertions" / ‡rJohn S. Rock, 1858 -- ‡tThe spirituals: "Go down, Moses" and "Didn't my Lord deliver Daniel."
50580. ‡tReconstruction and reaction : the aftermath of slavery and the dawn of segregation, 1861-1915. ‡t"What the black man wants" / ‡rFrederick Douglass, 1865 -- ‡tHenry McNeal Turner, Black Christian Nationalist -- ‡tBlack urban workers during Reconstruction: ‡tAnonymous document on the National Colored Labor Convention, 1869 ; ‡tNew York Tribune article on African-American workers, 1870 -- ‡t"Labor and capital are in deadly conflict" / ‡rT. Thomas Fortune, 1886 -- ‡tEdward Wilmot Blyden and the African diaspora -- ‡t"The Democratic idea is humanity" / ‡rAlexander Crummell, 1888 -- ‡t"A voice from the South" / ‡rAnna Julia Cooper, 1892 -- ‡tThe National Association of Colored Women: Mary Church Terrell and Josephine St. Pierre Ruffin -- ‡t"I know why the caged bird sings" / ‡rPaul Laurence Dunbar -- ‡tBooker T. Washington and the politics of accomodation: "Atlanta Exposition address" ; ‡t"My view of segregation laws" -- ‡tWilliam Monroe Trotter and the Boston Guardian -- ‡tRace and the Southern worker: ‡t"A Negro woman speaks" ; ‡tThe race question a class question" ; ‡t"Negro workers!" -- ‡tIda B. Wells-Barnett, crusader for justice -- ‡tWilliam Edward Burghardt Du Bois: ‡tExcerpts from "The conservation of races" ; ‡tExcerpts from The souls of black folk -- ‡tThe Niagara movement, 1905 -- ‡tHubert Henry Harrison, black revolutionary nationalist.
50580. ‡tFrom plantation to ghetto : the great migration, Harlem Renaissance, and World War, 1915-1954. ‡tBlack conflict over World War I: ‡tW.E.B. Du Bois, "Close ranks" ; ‡tHubert H. Harrison, "The descent of Du Bois" ; ‡tW.E.B. Du Bois, "Returning soldiers" -- ‡t"If we must die" / ‡rClaude McKay, 1919 -- ‡tBlack Bolsheviks: Cyril V. Briggs and Claude McKay: ‡t"What the African Blood Brotherhood stands for" ; ‡t"Soviet Russia and the Negro" -- ‡tMarcus Garvey and the Universal Negro Improvement Association: ‡t"Declaration of rights of the Negro Peoples of the world" ; ‡t"An appeal to the conscience of the black race to see itself" -- ‡t"Women as leaders / ‡rAmy Euphemia Jacques Garvey, 1925 -- ‡tLangston Hughes and the Harlem Renaissance: ‡t"The Negro artist and the racial mountain" ; ‡t"My America" ; ‡tPoems -- ‡t"The Negro woman and the ballot" / ‡rAlice Moore Dunbar-Nelson, 1927 -- ‡tJames Weldon Johnson and Harlem in the 1920s: ‡t"Harlem: the culture capital" -- ‡tBlack workers in the Great Depression -- ‡tThe Scottsboro Trials, 1930s -- ‡t"You cannot kill the working class" / ‡rAngelo Herndon, 1933: ‡t"Speech to the jury, January 17, 1933" ; ‡tExcerpt from "You cannot kill the working class -- ‡tHosea Hudson, black Communist activist -- ‡t"Breaking the bars to brotherhood" / ‡rMary McLeod Bethune, 1935 -- ‡tAdam Clayton Powell, Jr., and the fight for black employment in Harlem -- ‡tBlack women workers during the Great Depression: ‡tElaine Ellis, "Women of the cotton fields" ; ‡tNaomi Ward, "I am a domestic" -- ‡tSouthern Negro Youth Conference, 1939 -- ‡tA. Philip Randolph and the Negro March on Washington Movement, 1941 -- ‡tCharles Hamilton Houston and the war effort among African Americans, 1944 -- ‡t"An end to the neglect of the problems of the Negro woman!" / ‡rClaudia Jones, 1949 -- ‡t"The Negro artist looks ahead" / ‡rPaul Robeson, 1951 -- ‡tThurgood Marshall: The Brown decision and the struggle for school desegregation.
50580. ‡tWe shall overcome : the second reconstruction, 1954-1975. ‡tRosa PArks, Jo Ann Robinson, and the Montgomery Bus Boycott, 1955-1956. ‡tJo Ann Robinson's letter to Mayor of Montgomery ; ‡tInterview with Rosa Parks ; ‡tExcerpts from Jo Ann Robinson's account of the boycott -- ‡tRoy Wilkins and the NAACP -- ‡tThe Southern Christian Leadership Conference, 1957 -- ‡tStudent Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and the sit-in movement, 1960 -- ‡tFreedom songs, 1960s: ‡t"We shall overcome" ; ‡t"Ain't gonna let nobody turn me 'round" -- ‡t"We need group-centered leadership" / ‡rElla Baker -- ‡tMartin Luther King, Jr., and nonviolence: ‡tExcerpt from "Nonviolence and racial justice," 1957 ; ‡t"A have a dream," 1963 -- ‡tThe revolution is at hand" / ‡rJohn R. Lewis, 1963 -- ‡tThe salvation of American Negroes lies in Socialism" / ‡rW.E.B. Du Bois -- ‡t"The special plight and the role of black women" / ‡rFannie Lou Hammer -- ‡t"SNCC position paper: Women in the Movement," 1964 -- ‡tElijah Muhammad and the Nation of Islam -- ‡tMalcom X and Revolutionary Black Nationalism: ‡t"The ballot or the bullet" ; ‡tStatement of the Organization of Afro-American Unity" -- ‡tBlack power: ‡tStokely Carmichael, "What we want" ; ‡tSNCC, "Position paper on Black Power" ; ‡tBayard Rustin, "'Black Power' and coalition politics" -- ‡t"CORE endorses Black Power" / ‡rFloyd McKissick, 1967 -- ‡t"To atone for our sins and errors in Vietnam" / ‡rMartin Luther King, Jr., 1967 -- ‡tHuey P. Newton and the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense -- ‡t"The people have to have the power" / ‡rFred Hampton -- ‡t"I am a revolutionary black woman" / ‡rAngela Y. Davis, 1970 -- ‡t"Our thing is DRUM!" the League of Revolutionary Black Workers -- ‡tAttica: "The fury of those who are oppressed," 1971 -- ‡tThe National Black political Convention, Gary, Indiana, March 1972 -- ‡t"There is no revolution without the people" / ‡rAmiri Baraka, 1972: ‡t"The Pan-African Party and the Black Nation" ; ‡tPoem -- ‡t"My sight is gone but my vision remains" / ‡rMenry Winston: ‡t"On returning to the struggle" ; ‡t"A letter to my brothers and sisters."
50580. ‡tThe future in the present : contemporary African-American thought, 1975-present. ‡tBlack feminisms: The Combahee River Collective Statement, 1977 -- ‡t"Women in prison: how we are" / ‡rAssata Shakur, 1978 -- ‡tIt's our turn" / ‡rHarold Washington, 1983 -- ‡t"I am your sister" / ‡rAudre Lorde, 1984 -- ‡t"Shaping feminist theory" / ‡rbell hooks, 1984 -- ‡tThe movement against Apartheid: Jesse Jackson and Randall Robinson. ‡tJesse Jackson: "Don't adjust to Apartheid" ; ‡t"State of the U.S. Anti-Apartheid movement: an interview with Randall Robinson" -- ‡t"Keep hope alive" / ‡rJesse Jackson, 1988 -- ‡tAfrocentricity" / ‡rMolefi Asante -- ‡tThe Anita Hill-Clarence Thomas controversy, 1991. ‡t"African-American women in defense of ourselves" ; ‡tJune Jordan, "Can I get a witness?" -- ‡t"Race matters" / ‡rCornel West, 1991 -- ‡t"Black anti-Semitism" / ‡rHenry Louis Gates, Jr., 1992 -- ‡t"Crime-- causes and cures" / ‡rJarvis Tyner, 1994 -- ‡tLouis Farrakhan: The million man march, 1995 -- ‡t"A voice from death row" / ‡rMumia Abu-Jamal -- ‡t"Let justice roll down like waters" / ‡rAfrican-American Prisoners in Sing Sing, 1998. ‡t"Statement by Sing Sing Prisoners" ; ‡tMichael J. Love, "The prison-industrial complex: an investment in failure" ; ‡tWillis L. Steele, Jr. "River Hudson" -- ‡tBlack Radical Congress, 1998: ‡t"Principles of unity" ; ‡tThe struggle continues: setting a black liberation agenda for the 21st century" ; ‡tThe freedom agenda" -- ‡t2000 Presidential election. ‡t"Letter to Governor Bush from Chairperson Mary Frances Berry," 2001 -- ‡tHip-hop activism. ‡t"What we want" statement from Hip-Hop Action Summit Network, 2001 ; ‡t"Tookie protocol for peace," 2004 -- ‡tWorld Conference Against Racism-- Durban, South Africa -- ‡tAfrican Americans respond to terrorism and war. ‡t"Barbara Lee's stand," 2001 ; ‡t10 points from Iraq Veterans agianst the War, 2001 -- ‡tThe Cosby vs. Dyson Debate, 2004-2005. ‡tSummary of "Dr. Bill Cosby speaks at the 50th commemoration of the Brown vs. Tokepa Board of Education Supreme Court Decision" ; ‡tExcerpt from "Is Bill Cosby right?: or has the black middle class lost its mind?" -- ‡tU.S. Senate Resolution against lynching, 2005 -- ‡tHurricane Katrina Crisis, 2005: ‡t"This is criminal": Malik Rahim reports from New Orleans, 2005 -- ‡tBarack Obama's Presidential campaign, 2007-2008: ‡tExcerpts from National Democratic Party Convention speech, 2004 ; ‡t"A more perfect union," 2008.
650 0. ‡aAfrican Americans ‡xHistory ‡vSources. ‡0(SC LENDS)522844
650 0. ‡aAfrican Americans ‡xCivil rights ‡xHistory ‡vSources. ‡0(SC LENDS)539301
650 0. ‡aAfrican Americans ‡xSocial conditions ‡vSources.
7001 . ‡aMarable, Manning, ‡d1950-2011, ‡eeditor. ‡0(SC LENDS)36681
7001 . ‡aMullings, Leith, ‡eeditor. ‡0(SC LENDS)83123
901 . ‡aocn309835428 ‡bOCoLC ‡c707425 ‡tbiblio
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