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In the great maelstrom : conservatives in post-Civil War South Carolina / Charles J. Holden.

Holden, Charles J., (author.).

Available copies

  • 8 of 10 copies available at SC LENDS.

Current holds

0 current holds with 10 total copies.

Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Status Due Date
Beaufort - St. Helena Branch 975.7041 HOL (Text) 0530005630131 Adult Non-Fiction Available -
Beaufort - St. Helena Branch REC 975.7041 HOL (Text) 0530005630122 Adult Reconstruction Collection Available -
Colleton - Main Library SO. CAR. 975.7 Holden, Charles J. (Text) 3010211391 Adult SC Non-Fiction Available -
Florence - Main Library SCR 975.7041 Holden (Text) 33172003570742 Adult South Carolina Reference Available -
South Carolina State Library 975.7 HOLD (Text) 0010103022173 Adult SC Collection Available -
South Carolina State Library 975.7 HOLD (Text) 0010103022181 Adult SC Collection Available -
South Carolina State Library 975.7 HOLD (Text) 0010103022199 Adult SC Collection Non-Circulating -
South Carolina State Library 975.704 HOLD (Text) 0010102362299 Adult SC Collection Available -
South Carolina State Library 975.704 HOLD (Text) 0010102362315 Adult SC Collection Non-Circulating -
York - Rock Hill Branch SCR 975.7041 HOLDEN (Text) 33205007374057 Adult Special Collection Non-Fiction Available -

Record details

  • ISBN: 1570034761
  • ISBN: 9781570034763
  • Physical Description: 164 pages ; 24 cm
  • Publisher: Columbia : University of South Carolina Press, [2002]

Content descriptions

Bibliography, etc. Note:
Includes bibliographical references (pages 143-154) and index.
Formatted Contents Note:
The evil of this philosophy : Frederick Porcher and the Southern critique of progress, 1831-1860 -- I shook off my slumber : Frederick Porcher and the postwar conservative view -- The public business is ours : Edward McCrady, Jr. and the challenge from below, 1865-1900 -- Nearly hopeless of ever elevating either Negroes or crackers : Theodore Jervey, Jr. and the new century -- How can one ... not be Tory or Junker? : William Watts Ball and the war years, 1914-1945.
Summary, etc.:
Examines how traditional thinkers both adjusted and clung to their beliefs long after the war; Few would question the assertion that South Carolina remained a conservative state long after the Civil War; one only needs to stroll over the grounds of the state capitol to be reminded of this long-running tradition in the state's history. But few have bothered to ask how, in the years following utter defeat during the Civil War, South Carolina remained a philosophically conservative state. How did self-proclaimed South Carolina conservatives maintain their beliefs in elite rule, the importance of a living tradition, and white supremacy through the loss of slavery, the rise of industry, populism, progressivism, and on through the New Deal? A study of South Carolina intellectual history from the end of the Civil War in 1865 to the 1945 advent of the Aromic Age, In the Great Maelstrom explores this ideology. The collapse of the Confederacy and the abolition of slavery forced South Carolina thinkers to ask what they could still believe in. In reconstructing their world views to fit the times, they employed the principles of white supremacy, the politics of elitism, and historicism.
Subject: South Carolina > History > 1865-
South Carolina > Intellectual life.
South Carolina > Politics and government > 1865-1950.
Conservatism > South Carolina > History > 19th century.
Conservatism > South Carolina > History > 20th century.
Reconstruction (U.S. history, 1865-1877) > South Carolina.
Intellectuals > South Carolina > History > 19th century.
Intellectuals > South Carolina > History > 20th century.
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1001 . ‡aHolden, Charles J., ‡eauthor. ‡0(SC LENDS)339949
24510. ‡aIn the great maelstrom : ‡bconservatives in post-Civil War South Carolina / ‡cCharles J. Holden.
264 1. ‡aColumbia : ‡bUniversity of South Carolina Press, ‡c[2002]
264 4. ‡c©2002
300 . ‡a164 pages ; ‡c24 cm
336 . ‡atext ‡btxt ‡2rdacontent
337 . ‡aunmediated ‡bn ‡2rdamedia
338 . ‡avolume ‡bnc ‡2rdacarrier
504 . ‡aIncludes bibliographical references (pages 143-154) and index.
5050 . ‡aThe evil of this philosophy : Frederick Porcher and the Southern critique of progress, 1831-1860 -- I shook off my slumber : Frederick Porcher and the postwar conservative view -- The public business is ours : Edward McCrady, Jr. and the challenge from below, 1865-1900 -- Nearly hopeless of ever elevating either Negroes or crackers : Theodore Jervey, Jr. and the new century -- How can one ... not be Tory or Junker? : William Watts Ball and the war years, 1914-1945.
520 . ‡aExamines how traditional thinkers both adjusted and clung to their beliefs long after the war; Few would question the assertion that South Carolina remained a conservative state long after the Civil War; one only needs to stroll over the grounds of the state capitol to be reminded of this long-running tradition in the state's history. But few have bothered to ask how, in the years following utter defeat during the Civil War, South Carolina remained a philosophically conservative state. How did self-proclaimed South Carolina conservatives maintain their beliefs in elite rule, the importance of a living tradition, and white supremacy through the loss of slavery, the rise of industry, populism, progressivism, and on through the New Deal? A study of South Carolina intellectual history from the end of the Civil War in 1865 to the 1945 advent of the Aromic Age, In the Great Maelstrom explores this ideology. The collapse of the Confederacy and the abolition of slavery forced South Carolina thinkers to ask what they could still believe in. In reconstructing their world views to fit the times, they employed the principles of white supremacy, the politics of elitism, and historicism.
651 0. ‡aSouth Carolina ‡xHistory ‡y1865- ‡0(SC LENDS)492132
651 0. ‡aSouth Carolina ‡xIntellectual life.
651 0. ‡aSouth Carolina ‡xPolitics and government ‡y1865-1950. ‡0(SC LENDS)492139
650 0. ‡aConservatism ‡zSouth Carolina ‡xHistory ‡y19th century.
650 0. ‡aConservatism ‡zSouth Carolina ‡xHistory ‡y20th century.
650 0. ‡aReconstruction (U.S. history, 1865-1877) ‡zSouth Carolina. ‡0(SC LENDS)531316
650 0. ‡aIntellectuals ‡zSouth Carolina ‡xHistory ‡y19th century.
650 0. ‡aIntellectuals ‡zSouth Carolina ‡xHistory ‡y20th century.
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