Catalog

Record Details

Catalog Search



The end of the suburbs : where the American dream is moving / Leigh Gallagher.

Image of item

Available copies

  • 4 of 4 copies available at SC LENDS.

Current holds

0 current holds with 4 total copies.

Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Status Due Date
Anderson - Anderson Main Library 307.7409 Gallagher Leigh (Text) 22960000706761 Adult Non-Fiction Available -
Dorchester - Summerville Branch 307.74097 GAL (Text) 30018004399529 Adult Non-Fiction Available -
Lancaster - Indian Land Branch 307.74 GAL (Text) 30553103050722 Adult Non-Fiction Available -
South Carolina State Library 307.74 GALL (Text) 0010103585583 Adult Stacks Available -

Record details

  • ISBN: 9781591845256 (hc)
  • Physical Description: 261 pages : illustrations, map ; 24 cm
  • Publisher: New York, New York : Portfolio/Penguin, [2013]

Content descriptions

Bibliography, etc. Note: Includes bibliographical references and index.
Formatted Contents Note: The great urban exodus -- The master-planned American dream -- "My car knows the way to gymnastics" -- The urban burbs -- The end of the nuclear family -- Where the wealth is moving -- The future.
Summary, etc.: While the baby boomers helped fortify the notion of the suburban single-family house as the American dream, the millennials are headed in another direction, according to Fortune writer Gallagher. The recession, rising fuel prices, and demographic shifts that mean smaller families and fewer and later marriages are contributing to a decline in the appeal of the suburbs. Gallagher talked to homebuilders, developers, planners, transportation engineers, architects, psychologists, and home buyers and sellers in cities and suburbs to offer a fascinating portrait of housing and lifestyle trends. She examines how the American dream came to be tied to the suburbs even as they are lambasted in popular culture and by social scientists and, lately, planners and engineers. New Urbanists argue that the suburb is an unsustainable model because the low-density population doesn't generate enough tax base to support it, unless it sprawls. Gallagher points to research and analysis showing rising populations in urban areas and suburbs who adapt the ideals of green living and walkable communities. Fascinating reading on changing trends in how and where we live.
Subject: Suburbs > United States > History.
Suburban life > United States > History.

Additional Resources