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Don't make a black woman take off her earrings /

Perry, Tyler (author.).

Available copies

  • 3 of 3 copies available at SC LENDS.

Current holds

0 current holds with 3 total copies.

Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Status Due Date
Beaufort - Beaufort Branch FIC PER (Text) 0530004831521 Adult Audiobook Available -
Beaufort - Lobeco Branch FIC PER (Text) 0530004357774 Adult Audiobook Available -
Calhoun - Main Library CD F PER (Text) 30102100565231 Adult Audiobook Available -

Record details

  • ISBN: 9780143058724
  • ISBN: 014305872X
  • Physical Description: sound disc
    4 sound discs (approximately 4 hr., 30 min.) : digital ; 4 3/4 in.
  • Edition: Unabridged.
  • Publisher: New York : Penguin Audio, [2007]
  • Distributor: Prince Frederick, MD : Distributed by Landmark Audiobooks

Content descriptions

General Note: "Unabridged"--Container.
Compact disc.
Participant or Performer Note: Read by Tyler Perry.
Summary, etc.: The author's alter ego, the outspoken, worldly wise grandmother Madea, shares her thoughts on life, love, and everyone around her, reflecting on marriage, child-rearing, etiquette, the Bible and the church, beauty advice, and gun care.
Subject: Conduct of life Humor
Audiobooks

Syndetic Solutions - Publishers Weekly Review for ISBN Number 9780143058724
Don't Make a Black Woman Take off Her Earrings : Madea's Uninhibited Commentaries on Love and Life
Don't Make a Black Woman Take off Her Earrings : Madea's Uninhibited Commentaries on Love and Life
by Perry, Tyler
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Publishers Weekly Review

Don't Make a Black Woman Take off Her Earrings : Madea's Uninhibited Commentaries on Love and Life

Publishers Weekly


(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

One could say that if the title of this book confuses you, then you probably shouldn't be reading it. But, as Madea helpfully suggests, "If you don't understand something I'm saying here and you're not black, you will have to ask somebody who is." Madea-Southern-speak for "mother dear"-is the fierce alter ego of Tyler Perry, who has paraded the marijuana-smoking, pistol-packing, trash-talking matron through a series of hit gospel plays and films. Although primarily a comic figure based on unapologetically crude behavior coming from a harmless-looking old lady, Madea is envisioned by Perry (who provides his own introduction before turning the reins over to his inner grandma) as a throwback to a time when strong matriarchs ruled the community. The result is a surprisingly fresh compilation of homespun advice-which Madea says the reader should take "at your own risk"-on love, sex, getting ahead in life and (strangely) the thousand-plus uses of Vaseline. Although veering dangerously close to serious at times, Perry litters Madea's anarchic, stage-ready monologues with hilariously bad quips along the lines of "the grass is always greener on the other side, but the water bill is higher." (Apr. 11) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

Syndetic Solutions - BookList Review for ISBN Number 9780143058724
Don't Make a Black Woman Take off Her Earrings : Madea's Uninhibited Commentaries on Love and Life
Don't Make a Black Woman Take off Her Earrings : Madea's Uninhibited Commentaries on Love and Life
by Perry, Tyler
Rate this title:
vote data
Click an element below to view details:

BookList Review

Don't Make a Black Woman Take off Her Earrings : Madea's Uninhibited Commentaries on Love and Life

Booklist


From Booklist, Copyright (c) American Library Association. Used with permission.

\rtf1\ansi\deff0In the persona of Madea, his popular movie character, Perry offers commentary on life, from love and marriage to child rearing to politics. In the foreword, Perry admits to speaking more freely through Madea but cautions that he doesn't share all of her opinions, some of them characteristically caustic and risqu\'e9. Madea is the prototypical busybody neighbor woman who minds the behavior of all children\emdash and adults\emdash speaking her mind and imparting wisdom and rules in concert with good parenting and common sense. Perry laments the absence of Madeas from communities where children are now left untended by adults. Madea spices her commentaries with recollections of growing up in a black community in the South and growing wiser through tribulations. Tucked into all the silliness that is part of the character is some sound advice on life. Madea fans, and those who appreciate brutal honesty and the occasional off-color remark, will enjoy this book. --Vanessa Bush Copyright 2006 Booklist

Search Results Showing Item 4 of 94

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